Muckraking for the 21st Century

This post was written by guest blogger David McMillen, External Affairs Liaison in the Department of Strategy and Communications. I invite you to join me on Tuesday, April 12, 2011 for the Media Access to Government Information Conference (MAGIC) at the National Archives downtown.  The goal of the conference is to discuss how technology might improve access … Continue reading Muckraking for the 21st Century

Tech Tuesday: What's the Buzz?

Being a journalist in this digital and new media age presents challenges and frustrations of tracking down and accessing Federal, State, and Local government information needed to produce responsible and accurate news products. Read today’s blog for an invitation to a free conference co-sponsored by NARA and Duke University on April 12, focusing on ways that journalists and researchers may better discover, access, and use digital government information.

This is not your father’s history.

This post was written by guest blogger David McMillen, External Affairs Liaison in the Department of Strategy and Communications. Conventional wisdom is that the appraisal process for electronic records is the same as for paper. Richard Pearce-Moses made that statement in his 2006 Presidential Address to the joint meeting of Archivists in DC. Randall Jimerson quoted him … Continue reading This is not your father’s history.

Tech Tuesday: NCAST is now on Facebook!

NARA's Center for Advanced Systems and Technologies (NCAST) now has its very own official Facebook page. You can find it at https://www.facebook.com/NARACAST. On our page you will find, among other things: Links to papers, reports and presentations by our Research Partners Links to sites where you can download or try online free software  developed by … Continue reading Tech Tuesday: NCAST is now on Facebook!

"What Are You Working On, Mark Conrad?"

Ever wonder what exciting new projects the many employees at NARA are working on? The “What are You Working On?” blog feature aims to introduce a variety of NARA employees and highlight some of the exciting projects we are working on around the agency. Check for this blog series on Wednesdays! This week, we introduce … Continue reading "What Are You Working On, Mark Conrad?"

Tech Tuesday Tribute: Ken Thibodeau

Today’s post is a Tech Tribute to a NARA pioneer in the field of electronic records preservation.  Dr. Ken Thibodeau, after a distinguished career in the Federal Government, has retired from NARA as of 1.1.11. In 1975, Ken joined NARA’s Machine-Readable Archives Division, where he became part of a team that surveyed federal agencies on … Continue reading Tech Tuesday Tribute: Ken Thibodeau

Online Public Access is now available!

The National Archives’ new search interface is now available! Check out Online Public Access at http://www.archives.gov/research/search! The National Archives’ flagship initiative in our Open Government plan is to develop online services to meet the 21st century needs of the public. Toward that end we have revamped our website, including taking a new look at how … Continue reading Online Public Access is now available!

National Archives Contributes to Improved Digital Records Preservation and Access System

Yesterday, The National Archives (TNA) of the United Kingdom and NARA issued simultaneious press releases about the development and release of a significantly expanded PRONOM registry, which supports digital preservation. The announcement highlights the successful partnership between TNA and NARA’s Center for Advanced Systems and Technologies (NCAST) research partners, at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and the Army Research Lab.

Do you speak Volkswriter? MultiMate? Visicalc? Making Steps Toward a Universal File Format Reader

All file formats become obsolete over time. There are tens of thousands of formats in use today. How will we make sense of information stored in these formats over time? This week's Tech Tuesday entry talks about one line of research that is attempting to address this issue - the Data Format Descriptive Language (DFDL).

Retracing President Lincoln’s 12-day journey to Washington: shortening the journey of his digital records to Illinois

After winning the 1860 presidential election, Abraham Lincoln left his hometown of Springfield, Illinois, on a 12-day journey to Washington. With the help of our technology research partners in Illinois, it takes just a few seconds to send huge volumes of electronic copies of his records back to Lincoln's Presidential Library.