Searching for Something? Try the New Catalog!

Today’s post comes from Jason Clingerman, archives specialist in the Office of Innovation, Digital Engagement Division 

new catalog homepage- ship

Updated homepage featuring Austro-Americana & Fratelli Cosulich poster (NARA ID 7455537)

Have you visited the National Archives Catalog lately? Now’s a great time to stop by! The Catalog is the online public portal to National Archives records and information about our records. We’re excited to announce some big changes that will make it easier to use, more interactive, and an even more valuable research tool. Over the next several weeks, we’ll be highlighting these features along with tips on how to get the most from your visit. To get started, here’s a preview of the improvements you can expect in this new release:

  • Enjoy the updated homepage featuring background images from catalog records
  • Add your comments on digitized records, descriptions, and authority records
  • Find what you need with a more intuitive advanced search
  • Efficiently browse hits with better “Next Page” link placement
  • Track your Citizen Archivist contributions with updated user account pages
  • Add data from scanned records to your developer toolbox with increased API functionality

Want Catalog news and tips delivered directly to your inbox? Sign up for our occasional newsletter here. It’s a quick, fun read, and we promise not to spam you.

If you have questions and comments about the new version, or about the Catalog in general, please leave a comment or email us at catalog@nara.gov.

Posted in Catalog, Online Research, Research, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Special Report from WikiConference USA at NARA

As David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States David Ferriero, announced earlier on his blog, the National Archives was the 2015 host of WikiConference USA, the annual national conference for the Wikipedia editor community and enthusiasts. For NARA, the conference represented an opportunity to further our engagement with the Wikipedia community, which serves our mission of public access, and we found the event to be a resounding success—full of enlightening presentations and invigorating conversations with citizens dedicated, like us, to innovation and open knowledge.

WikiConference USA at the National Archives

WikiConference USA at the National Archives. (CC-BY-SA, by Gerald Shields)

The conference was held from October 9–11, and the following account comes from Robert Fernandez, a Wikipedian and Assistant Professor, Reference/Instructional Librarian at Saint Leo University’s Cannon Memorial Library. If you are interested in catching up on the conference’s proceedings, you can check out the hashtag at #WikiConUSA and watch the archived stream on NARA’s YouTube channel.

Robert Fernandez (left) speaks at WikiConference USA

Robert Fernandez (left) speaks at WikiConference USA. (CC-BY-SA, by Gerald Shields)

I’ve been a pseudonymous Wikipedia editor for over a decade, but at this weekend’s WikiConference USA at the National Archives I made my first public appearance as a Wikipedian.  Once a hobby I kept entirely separate from my professional life, like tinkering with a train set in the garage, it has now become an integral part of my professional career and research. Like the National Archives and other librarians, archivists, and information professionals and the institutions they work for, I’ve realized that Wikipedia and its associated projects are key resources for disseminating and preserving information, knowledge, and cultural heritages.

The conference opened with remarks from Pamela Wright, NARA’s Chief Innovation Officer, who outlined how NARA has been collaborating with Wikipedia in that effort, a collaboration that dates back to Wikipedia’s decennial celebration in 2011.  That collaboration has included hosting over a dozen Wikipedia-related events and uploading over a hundred thousand files to Wikimedia Commons, the online repository for freely usable media files, including most of the images and files on Wikipedia. In 2011, NARA hired the first Wikipedian in Residence in the US Federal Government, Dominic Byrd-McDevitt. Wikipedians in Residence are experienced Wikipedia editors embedded in archives, museums, libraries, and other cultural institutions to help them engage with the encyclopedia.

The keynote speech was delivered by Andrew Lih. Wikipedia’s founder, Jimmy Wales, has become a sort of spokesperson for the encyclopedia, explaining it and its importance to the outside world. Professor Lih plays something of the same unofficial role for academia and the Wikipedia community itself. His rousing speech, “What Wikipedia Must Do”, was a call to action for editors in eight important areas—usability in a time of growing mobile traffic, improving social interaction on the encyclopedia itself, gender and diversity, expert engagement, reimagining ways in which Wikimedians contribute original content, improving access to multimedia content on Wikipedia and related projects, partnerships with other organizations and institutions, and improving relationships between different groups of stakeholders.

After lunch, Dr. John Howard, Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discussed how the US Federal Government’s “science partners” wanted to engage with Wikipedia, especially after noticing how many of the incoming hits to the CDC’s website came from Wikipedia. He noted that Wikipedia was “a major channel for transparency and dissemination of government information and science”.  The National Archives is hosting a NIOSH-led workshop on Wikipedia for federal research agencies next month.

David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, followed with a discussion of the importance of working with Wikipedia, noting that his involvement with online encyclopedias dates back to the abortive Interpedia project back in the early 90s.  Ferriero appears to have a talent for delivering readily quotable statements, and this was no exception, saying that “What better way of engaging the American people than engaging the Wikipedia community to get the word out.

A panel presentation from the National Archives followed – including Wright, Byrd-McDevitt, Andrew Wilson, and Darren Cole – discussing the work NARA was doing with and related to Wikipedia, open access, and information dissemination.  Exciting projects like the Innovation Hub and the new API for NARA’s catalog take the DIY ethos and open access commitment of Wikipedia and apply them to traditional archival tasks. Citizen scanning of archival documents and the ability of people to add tags and transcriptions to items in the online catalog will be ways in which NARA, like Wikipedia, can use crowdsourcing to provide more access to and a richer context for its holdings.

The next morning, I emerged from the Metro stop on Pennsylvania Avenue to the sounds of a brass and drum band playing “Poison” by Bel Biv DeVoe. It was the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March, and the sidewalks and streets were filled with vibrant celebration and activity. Inside NARA, that day’s keynote was delivered by Alice Backer of AfroCrowd. AfroCrowd is a new organization devoted improving the representation and participation of Africans and African-Americans in Wikipedia and other open access projects. It was important that their vital work was on center stage at this conference, and not scheduled during the concurrent sessions as an optional “diversity” session that most conference participants might skip.

Highlighting the example of the documentary Garifuna in Peril and topics related to Garifuna, a Central American language and ethnic group of African and indigenous origin, Backer noted the problems encountered by editors mentored by AfroCrowd when attempting to write about topics that the white male-dominated editor base of Wikipedia are unfamiliar with. This problem is hardly limited to AfroCrowd and happens with many different  groups of new editors and topic areas. Many in the audience, including myself, were able to examples of their own experiences with these difficulties. The audience liked my suggestion that instead of having programs like AfroCrowd events only one-way educational experiences, where new editors are educated about Wikipedia, we needed to make the education a two-way process, where established Wikipedia editors are also informed about the significance of topics that groups like AfroCrowd are trying to document. How exactly to do this remains a challenge.

Another significant challenge to Wikipedia was discussed during the final day’s keynote. Danielle Citron, law professor at the University of Maryland, spoke on “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace“, the subject of her book last year from Harvard University Press.   Online harassment is an issue that Wikipedia is dealing with, and failing to deal with, more and more in recent years.  Following Citron’s presentation, many audience members shared their opinions and experiences with harassment on Wikipedia and looked to her for potential solutions.  From the audience, librarian Megan Wacha posted on Twitter “I do love that we’re all so engaged with this issue that we are way over time and no one cares”.  That’s certainly true, but taking that passion and employing it to solve this issue will require some hard choices by the community and perhaps some reassessment of our key values and approaches to Wikipedia.

In between all these speeches were the concurrent sessions where Wikipedians, including myself, presented workshops, presentations, and panels.   It isn’t fair to highlight particular panels or presentations just because I was able to participate in or attend them when there were so many Wikipedians talking about their work on topics ranging from education to metadata to pomological watercolors to dance.  While online, the atmosphere can sometimes, unfortunately, become heated or negative, at this conference I met scores of Wikipedians who were engaged, energized, and passionate about Wikipedia.

Posted in Events, Online Research, Research, Wikipedian in Residence | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Announcing NARA’s Digitization Priorities

We asked! You told us!

A few weeks ago, we asked the public for suggestions and feedback about NARA’s digitization priorities to help us develop an agency-wide priority list.  This list will guide the work of the digitization program over the next couple of years. After putting out that call, responses flooded into us with comments here on NARAtions, emails to digitization@nara.gov, and votes left in our first ever online town hall on Crowd Hall. We were excited by all of the responses and it was fun and interesting to see what you, the public, wanted to see NARA digitize.

Overwhelmingly, people asked us to digitize records of genealogical interest, including immigration and ethnic heritage records; military and veterans records, especially those from World War I and II; and, of course, records that had preservation concerns. People also suggested that we digitize records that relate to specific research themes, including diplomatic relations, law enforcement, and intelligence. When specific records were cited, we assessed the feasibility of digitizing those records and adding them to the list. In one case, the public demand for the “Helper Files” in RG 498, Records of Headquarters, European Theater of Operations, U.S. Army (WWII), was so great that those records were added to the list. I am happy to report that staff has already started to digitize those records and they will be available in the National Archives Catalog in a few months, if not earlier.

Public feedback – and public use of our records – was an important factor in determining what was included in the agency-wide digitization priority list. Many of the topics and broad themes that were publicly suggested are evident in the list, representing a broad range of materials that will enable NARA to further engage with our researchers online. We are excited about sharing the priority list with you and increasing the online availability of our holdings over the next few years.

The following represents our top priorities – it is by no means the entire list of what we would like to digitize over time; however, these projects will be our primary focus over the next 18-24 months. Please note, list order does not reflect order in which projects will be undertaken.

RG/Coll.              Title

Multiple                  Microfilm Publications
Multiple                  Records from Anchorage, Alaska Facility
Multiple                  Records from the William J. Clinton Library
Multiple                  Records of the U.S House of Representatives and U.S. Senate, 1789-1817
(records from the first 14 Congresses)
Multiple                  Treasure Vault Materials at National Archives at College Park (A2)
Multiple                  War Time Films and Photographs
RN-WHT                Nixon White House Tapes
JFKCO                     John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection
65                             Headquarter Files Pertaining to the Assassination of Martin Luther
King (MURKIN)
21                              All Naturalization Records
21                              Bankruptcy Dockets (within certain parameters)
26/36                        Seamen Records / Crew Lists
24                              Naval Muster Rolls
24                              Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships, 1801-1940
24                              Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships and Stations, 1941-1978
24                              Bureau of Naval Personnel Casualty Case Cards, 1964-1977
129                            Inmate Case Files (Leavenworth) – first 10,000 case files only
226                            Office of Strategic Services Personnel Files, 1942-1945
59                              Department of State Name Index, 1910-1959
59                              Department of State Central Decimal Files, 1910-1929
15                              Case Files of Disapproved Pension Applications of Veterans of the
Army and the Navy Who Served Mainly in the Civil War and the War
with Spain, 1861-1934
15                              Case Files of Disapproved Pension Applications of Widows and Other
Dependents of Veterans of the Army and Navy, 1861-1934
109                           Record Books of Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Offices of the
Confederate Government, 1874-1899
498                          Helper Files, ca. 1945 – 1947 – 19 series/multiple countries
407                           World War II Operations Reports, 1940-1948
29                             1950 Census Enumeration District Maps
373                           German Flown Aerial Photography, 1939-1945
145/114                   Indexes for Aerial Photography of Agricultural Stabilization and
Conservation Service, 1934-1954 / Indexes for Aerial Photography of
the Soil Conservation Service, 1934-1954
210                            Drawings of Relocation Centers, 1942-1945
111                            Signal Corps Photographs of American Military Activity, 1918-1981
80                             General Photographic File of the Department of Navy, 1943-1958

If you have any questions about the digitization priority list, please email digitization@nara.gov.

Posted in Uncategorized | 9 Comments

Introducing the Federal Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Toolkit

Today is an important day for participation and innovation in the federal government. The White House officially launched the Federal Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Toolkit, a tool that provides information and resources to help federal agencies use the power of public participation to help solve scientific and societal problems.

The launch of this toolkit solidifies the White House’s commitment to advancing the culture of innovation, learning, sharing and doing in the federal community. Through crowdsourcing, we can create approaches to educate, engage, and empower citizens to apply their curiosity and talents to a wide range of real-world problems.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Addresses Crowd at the White House Easter Egg Roll, 4/14/1941. National Archives Identifier 17343446

Franklin D. Roosevelt Addresses Crowd at the White House Easter Egg Roll, 4/14/1941. National Archives Identifier 17343446

Crowdsourcing is not new for us. Back in 2010, the Archivist of the United States introduced the concept of the Citizen Archivist, an effort to engage researchers, educators, historians and the public and provide them with the tools and support necessary to contribute their talents, knowledge and creativity to the mission of the National Archives.

Since then, we have worked hard to create opportunities for citizens to make substantive individual contributions to the records of the National Archives, making those records more accessible to the public.

With more than 12 billion pages of textual records, it’s clear that our mission to “Make Access Happen” would not be possible without the help of our citizen archivists. Each day, we are grateful for our citizen contributors who help make our holdings more discoverable by tagging and transcribing items in our online catalog, subtitling historical videos on Amara, and scanning records in our new Innovation Hub.

We are pleased to be featured as a case study in the White House’s new toolkit, with acknowledgment of the Citizen Archivist Dashboard as a demonstrated success story in federal crowdsourcing.

Citizen Archivist Dashboard Case Study

In support of today’s event at the White House, we’ve created a special “science takeover” in our Citizen Archivist Dashboard. Here you will find several new tagging missions, all containing science-related records from the National Archives.

And while you are there, take a look at the many other ways you can get involved. From tagging missions to transcribing documents, scanning photos to subtitling videos, there is a way for everyone to participate and contribute.

We would love to hear your ideas for how we can continue to expand the dashboard. As a citizen archivist, how do you see yourself contributing your knowledge and talents to the National Archives?

Posted in Events, Open Government, Research | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Archives Library and Information Center Roundtable

Please join us on Wednesday September 30, 2015 at 11:00 am for our next Reference Roundtable, hosted by the Textual Reference Services Branch at the National Archives at College Park (Archives II).

Jeff Hartley, NARA’s Chief Librarian, will be discussing the Archives Library and Information Center (ALIC). Join us to meet Jeff and learn more about ALIC at the National Archives and the wonderful resources it has to offer. Q&A will immediately follow the presentation.

Date: September 30, 2015
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Location: National Archives at College Park, Maryland. Lecture Room B

This session is free and open to the public. All researchers and staff are welcome to attend. We hope to see you there!

Mildred C. Crabtree, a civilian librarian, selects books in the library. 7/7/1976

Mildred C. Crabtree, a civilian librarian, selects books in the library for distribution to the wards at Kenner Army Hospital. 7/7/1976.

Posted in DC-area Researchers, Events, Research | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Findmypast.com Partnership Agreement for Public Comment

Since 2007, NARA has engaged in digitization partnerships to expand the online collections we can make available to the public. We are excited to announce that the partnership agreement with Findmypast.com is ready for public comment.

Findmypast.com is a privately held UK-based online genealogy service owned by British company DC Thomson Family History. You can learn more about Findmypast.com here: http://www.findmypast.com/company

The partnership agreement is available for public review and comment on our Digitization Partnerships page. To submit feedback, please email digitization@nara.gov, or leave a comment below.

The agreement will be available for comment until September 25, 2015.

Please consult NARA’s Principles for Partnerships for more information about our digitization partnerships.

Posted in Digitization, Online Research | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Relocation of Bankruptcy Records to National Archives at Kansas City

Today’s post comes from Sarah Herman, Supervisory Archivist in the Textual Processing branch at the National Archives in Washington, DC


UPDATE, 9/14/15: Due to the arrival of his Holiness Pope Francis in the Washington, DC area on September 22nd, the closure date at the National Archives at Washington, DC has been changed to September 17, 2015. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Staff at the National Archives at Washington, DC are moving approximately 913 cubic feet of Bankruptcy Case Files to Subtropolis, an archival facility that is an extension of the National Archives at Kansas City. This move will complete the consolidation of Bankruptcy Case files from facilities around the country into one location.

The records to be transferred to Kansas City are Bankruptcy Act of 1898 Case Files, 1898 – 1979, RG 21, A1 159 (National Archives Identifier: 563368).

Closure Date at the National Archives at Washington, DC: September 17, 2015.

Accessing the Records in Kansas City: Records stored in Subtropolis can be provided to researchers, with adequate advance notice, at the textual research room located at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO 64108, Tuesday through Saturday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.  This is coordinated through the archival staff located in Kansas City. All inquiries should be directed to KansasCity.Archives@nara.gov. All requests should be submitted at least two business days in advance.

Posted in DC-area Researchers, Research | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Thank You for Feedback on Renewal of the Ancestry.com Partnership Agreement

Recently on NARAtions we announced that the Ancestry partnership agreement was up for renewal and available for public comment until August 21, 2015. We received almost 70 responses (thank you!), from which a number of themes emerged.  Digitization Division director, Markus Most, previously addressed a few of these concerns as an update to that post. These concerns are again listed below:

How will records digitized by a partner be available to the public? ​

Records digitized and made available by partners are available online for free in all NARA research rooms across the country. You can use our public access PCs or NARA’s wifi to reach the sites for free.

Will NARA receive digital copies of the material digitized by the partners?  ​

NARA receives a set of images and metadata from the partner when digitization of materials is complete.

Will NARA put the digitized material online?  ​

NARA makes records digitized by Ancestry available in our online Catalog once the five year embargo period has elapsed. Records in the National Archives Catalog are available for free to the public.

Why does NARA partner with outside organizations? ​

To provide increased access to our records, we have partnered with both for-profit and non-profit organizations on digitization. Although they may be interested in genealogy records, the specific records these organizations are interested in can vary. Sometimes only one type of partner may be interested in a record series. We digitize in order to get our records online and expand access to them. We cannot do this by ourselves and so we are working with partners and looking into other avenues (see our Digitization Strategy for additional approaches) to make access happen. NARA has established principles for working with partners and you can read them at our NARA Principles for Partnerships page. (See our Strategic Plan for more information about our Strategic Goals.)

Two additional themes emerged from researcher feedback that we would like to respond to:

The embargo period is over for some partner images. Where are those images in NARA’s online catalog?

In 2013, NARA posted the first 250,000 partner images that could be released from the 2007 digitization year. Since then, we have continued to add images and additional capacity to handle the tremendous growth of the National Archives Catalog. There are currently over 5.25 million images in the Catalog. A significant proportion of these images come from our partner projects with new images added to the catalog on an ongoing basis.

Additionally, the partners have undertaken many digitization projects outside of the digitization partnerships, particularly before the partnerships were established. Partners oftentimes purchased microfilm publications, digitized them, and made them available on their websites. Because these images were produced outside of an agreement, NARA does not receive a copy. For example, the Revolutionary War pensions were digitized prior to a partnership agreement and are therefore not available through our catalog.

What quality control measures are in place to address indexing quality, image quality, and scanning accuracy?

Our quality control procedures currently are:

QC of imaging is the responsibility of the partner, following standards reported to, and approved by, NARA.  The precise standards are proprietary information.

QC of metadata is the responsibility of the partner, following standards reported to, and approved by, NARA.  The precise standards are proprietary information.

QC of content is the responsibility of NARA – Specifically, NARA does a page-by-page review against a five percent sample of the original records to find and identify information which might have been left out, such as the back of a document that has only a stamp or small notation.  All such information has to be captured.  (Higher levels are reviewed if quality concerns surface during review.)  The partner corrects any omissions found in the review. Skipped pages are imaged and inserted into the images folder at the correct location.

QC relating to transfer of digital materials to NARA – The partners send the digital materials to NARA on hard drives.  NARA staff checks a sample of the images and metadata to verify that the metadata on each hard drive is associated with the correct image and that the metadata the partner agreed to provide is delivered. The staff also checks a sample of the unique identifiers associated with each image to verify that the identifiers are correct. If there are problems with the metadata or images sent by the partner, NARA contacts the partner to resolve the problems.

Based on both internal and external feedback, our quality control processes are under review.

Thank you to all of the researchers who have taken the time to provide feedback on the renewal of the Ancestry partnership agreement.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

Ancestry.com Partnership Agreement for public comment

Today’s post comes from Onaona Guay, digitization partnerships coordinator at the National Archives.


Digitization partnerships present an opportunity for increased access to historical government information through the increased availability of information technology products and services. NARA has shown that partnerships with private, public, non-profit, educational, and Government institutions to digitize and make available holdings can be a powerful model.

NARA has enjoyed a successful partnership with Ancestry since 2008. NARA has also partnered with Fold3, Ancestry’s sister site, since 2007. In the month of June alone, NARA records received 8.8 million views on Ancestry.com, and 2.5 million views on Fold3.com.

We are renewing our partnership agreement with Ancestry.com and Fold3.com, and welcome public feedback. Here are the major updates to the agreement:

  • NARA effectively shortened the embargo period by 12-24 months by starting the embargo clock after scanning is completed rather than waiting for the partner to publish the collection. This incentivizes the partner to post quickly, rather than waiting for an entire project to be completed. It also allows NARA to monitor when the embargo period should start.
  • In very rare circumstances, a Partner would digitize material and not post it online immediately, but would wait until the collection was completely finished. The updated agreement drives the Partners to post segments of large collections immediately rather than waiting for the entire collection to be completed.
  • NARA will have the latitude to recover almost any cost associated with supporting Partners.
  • The updated agreement provides NARA the right to not recover costs from Partners. NARA will spell out all cost recovery in the project plan.
  • Outlines NARA’s commitment to protecting PII and more specifically spells out the Partners’ responsibilities if PII is identified.

The partnership agreement is available for public review and comment on our Digitization Partnerships page. To submit feedback, please email digitization@nara.gov, or leave a comment below.

The agreement will be available for comment until August 21, 2015.

Please consult NARA’s Principles for Partnerships for more information about our digitization partnerships.

—-
Update: August 13, 2015. Thank you for your comments. In response to several questions and comments, a few themes have emerged that we wanted to respond to:

How will records digitized by a partner be available to the public? 
– Records digitized and made available by partners are available online for free in all NARA research rooms across the country. You can use our public access PCs or NARA’s wifi to reach the sites for free.

Will NARA receive digital copies of the material digitized by the partners?  
– NARA receives a set of images and metadata from the digitization partner when the project is complete.

Will NARA put the digitized material online?  
– NARA makes records digitized by Ancestry available in our online Catalog once the five year embargo period has elapsed. Records in the National Archives Catalog are available for free to the public.

Why does NARA partner with outside organizations? 
– To complete digitization projects, we have partnered with both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Although they may be interested in genealogy records, the specific records these organizations are interested in can vary. Sometimes only one type of partner may be interested in a record series. We digitize in order to get our records online and expand access to them. We cannot do this by ourselves and so we are working with partners and looking into other avenues (see our Digitization Strategy for additional approaches) to make access happen. NARA has established principles for working with partners and you can read them at our NARA Principles for Partnerships page. (See our Strategic Plan for more information about our Strategic Goals.)

Posted in Digitization, Online Research, Open Government, Research | Tagged , , , , | 63 Comments

Register for the Open Government Public Meeting on July 30

Please participate in the upcoming public meeting to discuss the development of the third US Open Government National Action Plan. We need your suggestions to help strengthen open government.

Open Government Public Meeting

Thursday, July 30, 2015
2:00 – 4:00 PM
National Archives and Records Administration
700 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
William G. McGowan Theater
Washington, DC 20408
Register to attend.

Please use the Special Events entrance at the corner of 7th and Constitution Ave for this event. The event will also be live-streamed on Whitehouse.gov/live.

The Public Meeting will include presenters from the Open Government Partnership, the White House, the National Archives, and other Federal agencies, as well as representatives from civil society stakeholders. Contribute your suggestions in person or online through email at opengov@ostp.gov, on Twitter @OpenGov, and on Hackpad with your suggestions.

The United States will publish the third Open Government National Action Plan (NAP) later this year as part of our commitment to the Open Government Partnership. The NAP will include new and expanded open government commitments that will be fulfilled in the next two years. In the first and second US NAPs, previous commitments related to our work at NARA have included:

  • Modernize management of government records
  • Establish a FOIA modernization advisory committee
  • Transform the security classification system
  • Pilot technological tools to analyze classified Presidential records
  • Implement monitoring and tracking of declassification reviews
  • Implement the controlled unclassified information (CUI) program
  • Increased crowdsourcing and citizen science programs

Please keep in mind the following principles as you think of your suggestions for the US open government commitments. NAP commitments should be:

  • Ambitious: pushing government beyond current practice by strengthening transparency, accountability, and public participation
  • Relevant: advancing one of the four open government principles of (1) transparency, (2) accountability, (3) participation, and/or (4) technology and innovation
  • Specific: describing the problem to be solved and expected outcomes
  • Measurable: allowing independent observers to gauge whether the commitment has been complete
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