Question: What is your favorite history-, library-, or archives-related blog?

What is your favorite history-, library-, or archives-related blog?

With the vast array of personal, professional, academic and commercial blogs available to readers today, it can be difficult trying to find just the right one to suit your needs. While it might be fun, who has the time to skim through 308,026 blogs? (That’s the current number of Google hits for blogs with some variation on “archival,” “historical” or “library” in their titles alone!)

Because we know a lot of our readers are dedicated researchers and practitioners themselves, we’re interested in hearing about some of the best examples of history-, library-, or archives-related blogs you’ve encountered, whether scholarly, practical, or just entertaining. Your recommendation may be just what someone else is looking for!

14 thoughts on “Question: What is your favorite history-, library-, or archives-related blog?

  1. I like The Genealogue (www.genealogue.com). Chris always has unusual and funny items of interest. As a true genealogy nut, I love the The Challenges (Chris challenges his readers to find ancestors of famous people in the news.)

  2. Here are the blogs that have a home in my GReader subscriptions and haven’t been mentioned yet:

    Beaver Archivist (Terry Baxter) http://terryx.wordpress.com/
    Cultural Heritage (UKOLN) http://blogs.ukoln.ac.uk/cultural-heritage/
    Digital Curation Blog (DCC) http://digitalcuration.blogspot.com/
    Game Preservation (IGDA Preservation SIG ) http://www.igda.org/preservation/
    Although there hasn’t been a new one in some time, Gaming in Libraries – The Course http://www.gamesinlibraries.org/course/
    HangingTogether (RLG) http://hangingtogether.org/
    Librarian X (Jason Puckett) http://jasonpuckett.net/
    Practical E-Records (Chris Prom) http://e-records.chrisprom.com/

    And although it’s digital humanities and not strictly cultural heritage related, the folks aggregated by Grand Text Auto often have some very interesting things to say: http://grandtextauto.org/

    Similarly, I don’t think Jason Scott is a professional archivist, but he’s done some great work. Including recently digitizing a large chunk of the Stephen Meretzky (Infocom) papers recently donated to Stanford. http://ascii.textfiles.com/

    And this one’s only BY an archivist, but I highly recommend it! John Fleckner recounts his cross-continental summer cycling trip as it happens: http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=3Tzut&doc_id=5071&v=Zg

  3. Questions like this are valuable since I’ve now found more blogs to add to the 400 plus I already read. Although he also covers politics, I’m fond of Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub. He has a teacher’s perspective on the resources he finds. http://timpanogos.wordpress.com/

  4. Thanks to everyone for the great recommendations! We’re glad to hear that you’re finding each others’ suggestions useful.

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    Thanks again for your participation on NARAtions. We love watching the conversations develop with such a variety of thoughts and insights- keep it up!

  5. I have many favourite in these genres, but here I’ll name just one.

    Ahoy – Mac’s weblog.

    Written by an 87 year old living in Melbourne, Australia it is about Naval, Maritime and Australian history.

    This is the link:

    http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/

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